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Fox-1Cliff/AO-95 Receive Anomaly

søn, 09/12/2018 - 14:29
AO-95 (Fox-1Cliff) CubeSat

AO-95 (Fox-1Cliff) CubeSat

Following the launch of Fox-1Cliff/AO-95 AMSAT Engineering began the commissioning process, with the help of AMSAT Operations, on Tuesday, December 4.

Satellite telemetry indicates that the bird is healthy, and I thank all of the stations who have captured and relayed the telemetry that enabled us to monitor and determine the health of the various systems on board. Fox-1Cliff required an extended period monitoring battery and power levels due to the anomaly and fix that was applied back in February of 2016 during environmental testing, and the result of that is positive.

However, during the next steps of commissioning we discovered an anomaly with her receive capability. After a few days of tests, analysis, and discussion, it appears that Fox-1Cliff/AO-95 will not be commissioned as our fourth Fox-1 amateur radio satellite.

AMSAT Engineering will continue to evaluate and test Fox-1Cliff/AO-95 for solutions to the anomaly and your continued help in providing telemetry is appreciated so that we can have data throughout her daily orbits rather than limited data over our U.S. stations. The data, analysis, and testing could lead to a positive solution but at the very least will be important to AMSAT’s satellite programs in providing information that would help us and others, as we do freely share our successes and failures, to avoid similar situations with future missions.

I would like to thank all of the AMSAT Fox Engineering volunteers who made Fox-1Cliff possible and continue to build our new satellites, becoming even better as we move forward.

I will provide more information on the anomaly and any determination we make regarding the possible cause or causes as well as information on the possibility of recovery, over time. Please be patient regarding that. Many of you have probably built a project and had to troubleshoot it on your bench, we are in a troubleshooting situation here with the additional challenge of being 600 km away from our bench.

Jerry Buxton, N0JY, AMSAT Vice President of Engineering

Source AMSAT News Service, sign up for emails at
https://www.amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/ans

JY1Sat designated Jordan-OSCAR 97 (JO-97)

lør, 08/12/2018 - 11:09
JY1SAT CubeSat

JY1SAT CubeSat

On December 3rd, 2018, JY1Sat was launched on a Falcon 9 vehicle from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. Part of Spaceflight’s SSO-A: Smallsat Express launch, JY1Sat is a project of the Crown Prince Foundation of Jordan. Telemetry has been received and decoded around the world since the launch.

At the request of the Crown Prince Foundation, AMSAT hereby designates JY1Sat as Jordan-OSCAR 97 (JO-97). We congratulate the owners and operators of JO-97, thank them for their contribution to the amateur satellite community, and wish them continued success on this and future projects.

73,
Drew Glasbrenner, KO4MA
AMSAT VP Operations / OSCAR Number Administrator

Knacksat team request telemetry reports

fre, 07/12/2018 - 18:52
Some of the Knacksat team

Some of the Knacksat team

Tanan Rangseeprom HS1JAN has requested radio amateurs to help with receiving telemetry data from the Knacksat CubeSat that was launched on December 3.

Knacksat in CubeSat Deployer

Knacksat in CubeSat Deployer

On the AMSAT Bulletin Board Tanan writes:

My name is Tanan Rangseeprom my callsign HS1JAN. I am project manager of JAISAT-1 satellite. I am very happy that Thailand, represented by King Mongkut’s University of Technology North Bangkok (KMUT-NB), has successfully launched a Knacksat satellite from the SSO-A mission on
December 3, 2018.

The Knacksat team are very happy to learn that Mike Rupprecht, DK3WN had been the first person to receive the CW signal, however, after that satellite receive ground stations of KMUT-NB HS0AK and ground station of RAST HS0AJ and AMSAT HS members in Thailand have tried to receive the CW signal from the Knacksat satellite but we have not been able to receive any transmission at all. Hence, I am asking for help from all AMSAT members by asking them to please try to receive the CW signal and confirm this online at the following website:

https://knacksat-26d23.firebaseapp.com/decoder

When you provide a signal report online, the Knacksat team will have a very nice QSL card and gift to send in response to thank you for helping us by receiving our signal. In addition, in the future when the satellite is operational, the Knacksat team will be able to provide a packet radio uplink on VHF so that the satellite can respond count number to you with its callsign. So I would like to ask all AMSAT amateur radio operators to please help us in this and to please send any data back to us online website.

Info for amateur radio communities
Call sign: HS0K
CW beacon: 435.635 MHz
comment please send to: knacksat <at> gmail.com.
information of satellite: http://www.knacksat.space/

Thank you in advance.
With respect. 73
Tanan Rangseeprom HS1JAN
AMSAT HS member

AMSAT Bulletin Board http://www.amsat.org/pipermail/amsat-bb/

Knacksat CubeSat

Knacksat CubeSat

Es’hail-2 ham radio transponders in TX Factor show

fre, 07/12/2018 - 18:01
Es'hail-2 Geostationary Satellite - credit Es'hailSat

Es’hail-2 Geo Satellite – credit Es’hailSat

In Episode 22 of the popular amateur radio show TX Factor, AMSAT-UK’s Graham Shirville G3VZV explains what to expect when the geostationary satellite Es’hail-2 is in full operation.

This episode features two new exciting radios. There’s a sneak preview of the Yaesu FTdx 101 hybrid transceiver and a comprehensive overview of the high-performance Icom IC-R6800 general coverage receiver.

Pete Sipple M0PSX visits the 2018 RSGB Convention. We chat with Graham Shirville G3VZV with an update on the latest news from AMSAT-UK including what to expect when the geostationary satellite Es’hail-2 is in full operation. And more down to earth, Bob Mccreadie G0FGX ventures into the controversial world of Network Radio!

Watch TX Factor – Episode 22 (TXF022)

Es’hail-2 https://amsat-uk.org/satellites/geosynchronous/eshail-2/

AMSAT-UK: https://amsat-uk.org/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AmsatUK
Facebook: https://facebook.com/AmsatUK
YouTube: https://youtube.com/AmsatUK

CubeSats to launch from New Zealand

fre, 07/12/2018 - 15:53
Electron rocket in New Zealand Dec 6, 2018 - credit Rocket Lab

Electron rocket in New Zealand Dec 6, 2018 – credit Rocket Lab

Terry Osborne ZL2BAC has provided some information on the upcoming launch from New Zealand of 10 CubeSats on the Rocket Labs Electron ELaNa-19 mission, a number of the satellites carry amateur radio payloads.

On the AMSAT Bulletin Board Terry writes:

From Rocket Lab’s recent twitter post:
A nine-day launch window for the ELaNa-19 mission opens 13 – 21 December 2018, UTC.
Lift-off from Launch Complex 1 is scheduled between:
04:00 – 08:00 UTC (13 Dec) 17:00 – 21:00
NZDT (13 Dec) 20:00 – 00:00
PST (12/13 Dec) 23:00 – 03:00
EST (12/13 Dec)

See https://www.rocketlabusa.com/news/updates/rocket-lab-prepares-to-launch-historic-small-satellite-mission-for-nasa/

The launch will be streamed from their web site at https://www.rocketlabusa.com/live-stream
See also https://www.rocketlabusa.com/launch-info/launch-complex-1/

Satellites to be launched are:
ELaNa XIX
Date: NET December 11, 2018
Mission: Rocket Lab Flight 4, Electron, Mahia, New Zealand
10 CubeSat Missions scheduled to be deployed

• ALBUS – NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio
• CeREs – NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland
• CHOMPTT – University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
• CubeSail – University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
• DaVinci – North Idaho STEM Charter Academy, Rathdrum, Idaho
• ISX – SRI International/ California Polytechnic University
• NMTSat – New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology
• RSat – United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland
• Shields-1 – NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia
• STF-1 – West Virginia University / NASA IV&V

73, Terry Osborne ZL2BAC

AMSAT Bulletin Board http://www.amsat.org/pipermail/amsat-bb/

Fox-1Cliff Designated AMSAT-OSCAR 95 (AO-95)

ons, 05/12/2018 - 20:55
AO-95 (Fox-1Cliff) CubeSat

AO-95 (Fox-1Cliff) CubeSat

On December 3rd, 2018, Fox-1Cliff was launched on a Falcon 9 vehicle from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California

Part of Spaceflight’s SSO-A: Smallsat Express launch, Fox-1Cliff was named after long time AMSAT supporter Cliff Buttschardt, K7RR (SK). In the 48 hours after launch, more than 110 amateur radio operators around the world have successfully received and submitted telemetry from the satellite.

Following in our long tradition of naming amateur satellites, AMSAT hereby designates Fox-1Cliff as AMSAT-OSCAR 95 (AO-95).

Thank you to those who have supported this mission with their time, talent, and financial support for the benefit of amateur radio operators worldwide.

73,
Drew Glasbrenner, KO4MA
AMSAT VP Operations / OSCAR Number Administrator

AO-95 https://www.amsat.org/tlm/leaderboard.php?id=3&db=FOXDB

Frequencies of amateur radio satellites on the same launch as AO-95
https://amsat-uk.org/2018/11/14/ssoa-amateur-radio-satellites/

FUNcube Payload Telemetry Dashboards

lør, 01/12/2018 - 20:38
JY1SAT CubeSat

JY1SAT CubeSat

Sunday, December 2, 2018 should see two more satellites carrying FUNcube payloads launched into orbit.

With that launch, JY1Sat and ESEO will join FUNcube-1 (AO-73) and Nayif-1 (EO-88).

The FUNcube team have been busy, not only designing and implementing the payloads, but also working on the Telemetry Dashboards and the Data Warehouse.

Each satellite has a dedicated dashboard and we have created a one page summary (FUNcube Dashboard Summary v1) of those dashboards, their current version number and a dedicated download link.

Telemetry Dashboard

We have included the recommended warehouse settings for each satellite as well as the “FCD Centre Frequency”. Note that the frequency we quote is 20 kHz offset from the published telemetry downlink to allow for the zero Hertz spike and close in phase noise that is inherent on SDRs.

Currently, to view the telemetry for a particular satellite, it is necessary to run the dashboard for that satellite. Any telemetry for one of the other FUNcube satellites can be captured and forwarded to the central data warehouse. For this reason, some users tend to run all dashboards simultaneously using the same FUNcube Dongle. Users should remember the that dashboard that was started last, is the one that will control the frequency settings applied to the FUNcube Dongle.

These dashboards are under continual development and the next planned development is to create a single dashboard that will service all FUNcube Telemetry payloads simultaneously. Keep a look out for further news on this unified dashboard in 2019.

ESEO satellite in the anechoic chamber at the ESTEC test facilities, in the Netherlands

ESEO satellite in the anechoic chamber at the ESTEC test facilities, in the Netherlands

Telemetry Data Warehouse

All telemetry received via the dashboards is forwarded to the central data warehouse, providing you have registered for an account. This has been a very successful part of the FUNcube project as it has allowed for worldwide data collection by amateurs and for all the data to be available to download and used for educational purposes.

With the pending launch of two additional satellites, some changes where required to allow this data capture to continue in an efficient manner. The data warehouse has a new user interface and all satellite data can be assessed with one URL – http://data.amsat-uk.org/

Once at the new user interface, simply select the satellite you are interested in, and all the usual telemetry will be available along with the list of current data providers to the database for that satellite.

Both the dashboards and the data warehouse are under continual development, so be sure to check back for updates.

The FUNcube team is very grateful to all radio amateurs worldwide for their continued support and we encourage you all to join in with the reception of JY1Sat and ESEO telemetry upon a successful launch this Sunday.

73s Ciaran Morgan M0XTD

FUNcube Dashboard Summary v1
https://funcubetest2.files.wordpress.com/2018/12/funcube-dashboard-summary-v1.pdf

Information on other spacecraft on the SSO-A mission with amateur radio payloads
https://amsat-uk.org/2018/11/14/ssoa-amateur-radio-satellites/

Es’hail-2 Update

ons, 28/11/2018 - 22:01
Es'hail-2 Geostationary Satellite - credit Es'hailSat

Es’hail-2 Geostationary Satellite – credit Es’hailSat

Es’hail-2 is still in a temporary GEO slot, according to the Keps at ~24°E. This is not the final location which planned to be at 26°E

The satellite Es’hail-2, carrying amateur radio transponders, launched from the Kennedy Space Center at 2046 GMT on Thursday, November 15, 2018.

On the AMSAT Bulletin Board Peter Gülzow DB2OS writes:

During the next 1-2 month they will perform some fine tuning and extensive In-Orbit-Testing in this position not to interfere with other GEO satellites nearby.

Once that is finished, the satellite will slowly be drifting to and stationed at the final position.

However, several “hunters” have already spotted the Engineering beacon from Es’hail-2, so obviously everything looks good and is according to the plan..

Amateur radio satellites launched from India November 29

tir, 27/11/2018 - 14:33
Reaktor Team's Quasars and CubeSats Scientist Sissi Enestam

Reaktor Team’s Quasars and CubeSats Scientist Sissi Enestam

Satellites with Amateur Radio payloads launched from India on the ISRO PSLV-C43 mission at 0427 GMT on Thursday, November 29, 2018.

Among the satellites is the Reaktor Hello World CubeSat, callsign OH2RHW, carrying a Packet Radio Digipeater. The 437.775 MHz beacon transmitter was expected to be activated and start sending Morse code at around 1100 GMT on Thursday. The team had said the first person to record and report the beacon gets an RHW mission T-shirt.

Reaktor Hello World RF specification and TLE are available at https://reaktorspace.com/reaktor-hello-world/

The Morse code (CW) transmission from Reaktor Hello World was received and tweeted by Tetsurou Satou JA0CAW in Japan at 1150 GMT.

In response to JA0CAW’s tweet the Reaktor team responded with WOOOHOOOO!!!!

Reception of Reaktor Hello World by Tetsurou Satou JA0CAW

Reception of Reaktor Hello World by Tetsurou Satou JA0CAW

Talking to the Times of India, ISRO chair Kailasavadivoo Sivan said, “We are going to to launch HySIS at 9.59 am [IST] on November 29 from Sriharikota. Over 30 foreign satellites, including nano and mini satellites, will also be launched along with the main payload. Out of the 30 commercial satellites, 23 are from the US.”
https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/isro-to-launch-hyperspectral-imaging-sat-with-30-foreign-satellites-on-nov-29/articleshow/66801810.cms

The satellites with amateur radio payloads, all CubeSats, are:

3CAT1 http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=370

FacSat-1 http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=635

InnoSat-2 http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=548

Reaktor Hello World https://twitter.com/RHW_Satellite/
https://reaktorspace.com/reaktor-hello-world/
http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=503

IARU Satellite Frequency Coordination http://amsat.org.uk/iaru

FCC rejects AMSAT Orbital Debris Petition

lør, 24/11/2018 - 20:51

FCC SealARRL reports the FCC has rejected a Petition for Reconsideration that AMSAT filed 14 years ago, seeking to exempt Amateur Radio satellites from the FCC’s satellite orbital debris mitigation requirements.

The ARRL story says:

The Commission took the opportunity in a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking and Order on Reconsideration, released on November 19, that revisits its orbital debris rules for the first time since their adoption in 2004. Among other things, AMSAT had argued at the time of its Petition that applying the orbital debris requirements to Amateur Radio satellites would be cost prohibitive, and that the FCC had not indicated what constitutes an acceptable orbital debris mitigation plan.

Acknowledging that time has made some of AMSAT’s arguments moot, the FCC said the costs involved with modifications to comply with post-mission disposal requirements “are justified when balanced against the public interest in mitigating orbital debris.” The FCC said it determined that closer adherence to the disposal methods described in the rules was “warranted in order to limit the growth of orbital debris” in low-Earth orbit (LEO).

“In any event, in the years since the debris mitigation rules were adopted, and notwithstanding any costs imposed by FCC regulations, well over 150 small satellites have been authorized, with at least 20 of those considered amateur satellites,” the FCC said in its November 15 Order on Reconsideration. “It appears that, to the extent that any costs have been incurred, the main contributor to costs for amateur and similar LEO missions has to do with the availability of launches to appropriate orbits.”

The FCC also said that in the years since the FCC issued its Orbital Debris Order, “numerous licensees, including amateur satellites operating in LEO, have successfully satisfied our orbital debris mitigation requirements.

FCC Notice of Proposed Rulemaking and Order on Reconsideration
https://docs.fcc.gov/public/attachments/FCC-18-159A1.pdf

2004 AMSAT Petition for Reconsideration
https://ecfsapi.fcc.gov/file/6516493220.pdf

2004 FCC Second Report and Order IB Docket No. 02-54
https://docs.fcc.gov/public/attachments/FCC-04-130A1.pdf

Source ARRL http://www.arrl.org/news/fcc-rejects-2004-amsat-petition-to-reconsider-applying-orbital-debris-rules-to-ham-satellites

Happy 5th Birthday FUNcube-1

ons, 21/11/2018 - 20:45
First signals received from FUNcube-1

First signals received from FUNcube-1

Five years ago, on November 21, 2013, FUNcube-1 launched into space. Soon, we hope to welcome ESEO (FUNcube-4) and JY1SAT (FUNcube-6) into space. A remarkable achievement by the radio amateur volunteers of AMSAT-UK and AMSAT-NL.

Happy Birthday FUNcube-1.

In 2010, we got the first prototypes working and got zero packet errors when testing the downlink chain!

In 2012, we were assembling the flight model in the ISISpace clean room. ISISpace has been the satellite integrator for this mission and continues to partner with AMSAT-UK on multiple missions.

Another big milestone straight after assembly of the spacecraft: the antenna deployment test! During this test, we pretend the satellite is in space for the first time, and check that it successfully starts up and starts transmitting to the world.

After the deployment testing, the antennas need to be stowed again, and then we arm the satellite for launch and place it in its deployment canister together with our fellow passengers HiNCube and ZACUBE-1. In this case the ISISpace ISIPOD was used.

Next up: transport to the launch base, fitting to the rocket, and LAUNCH! FUNcube was launched 21 November 2013 at 07:10 UTC on a Dnepr rocket from Yasny Launch Base. Thanks ISILaunch for taking us up on ISILaunch03.

Since then, we have had FUNcube systems in UKube-1, QB50p1, Nayif-1 and the upcoming ESEO and JY1SAT spacecraft, bringing the total FUNcube payloads launched for STEM education and amateur radio to six.

In 5 years, FUNcube has transmitted for 157,766,400 seconds, with a 256kB frame every 5 seconds, equating to approx 7.5GB of data. Our ground network has recovered 1.7GB. On average, we see 105 daily listeners, receiving 3688 frames per day. At minimum, we still had 40 listeners.

Users receiving FUNcube-1 telemetry and uploading to Data Warehouse

Users receiving FUNcube-1 telemetry and uploading to Data Warehouse

We were very conservative with our power budget. The battery is almost always full, and quickly charges up after eclipse. The solar panel current Ipv does not show significant degradation. the ISI Space solar panels and GOMspace EPS are doing a wonderful job.

FUNcube-1 Solar Flux versus Power Generation

FUNcube-1 Solar Flux versus Power Generation

On board temperatures have been at maximum 43.2°C, and at minimum -26.7°C, disregarding some outliers caused by the satellite rebooting. We have had two periods of continuous illumination, which can be seen by the temperature rises.

FUNcube-1 Temperature

FUNcube-1 Temperature

Wouter Weggelaar PA3WEG

FUNcube-1 (AO-73) information https://amsat-uk.org/satellites/communications/funcube-1/

ESEO launch information and Dashboard

ons, 21/11/2018 - 18:31
ESEO satellite in the anechoic chamber at the ESTEC test facilities, in the Netherlands

ESEO satellite in the anechoic chamber at the ESTEC test facilities, in the Netherlands

The launch of the ESEO spacecraft has now been confirmed to be on board the SSO-A flight from Vandenberg currently scheduled for Wednesday, November 28 at 18:32 GMT.

The ESEO microsatellite includes a FUNcube payload which will provide similar telemetry to its predecessors but will have a more powerful transmitter and thus be even easier to hear. For amateurs, this payload will also provide a single channel L/V transponder for FM. These downlinks will be transmitted on 145.895 MHz and the FM transponder uplink will be on 1263.5 MHz with a 67Hz PLL tone required.

A new Dashboard has been developed for this mission and a finalised pre-launch version will available for download within the next few days. In the meantime here is the AMSAT FUNcube Payload Downlink Data document. This gives all the information required to decode the telemetry ESEO_Downlink_Data_1_21a

The new Dashboard will operate in exactly the same manner as those developed for previous missions and general set-up information can be downloaded here: Dashboard Guidance

A new Data Warehouse has also been created. This can be used to view the telemetry from ALL of the FUNcube missions: http://data2.amsat-uk.org/

We expect that the FUNcube telemetry transmitter will become operational after the launch and subsequent to the completion of initial de-tumbling of the spacecraft.

Thanks for your valuable support for this mission!

More information on ESEO is available from ESA Education’s website
https://www.esa.int/Education/ESEO

Information on other SSO-A spacecraft with amateur radio payloads
https://amsat-uk.org/2018/11/14/ssoa-amateur-radio-satellites/

ESEO ready for launch

lør, 17/11/2018 - 18:52
ESEO satellite in the anechoic chamber at the ESTEC test facilities, in the Netherlands

ESEO satellite in the anechoic chamber at the ESTEC test facilities, in the Netherlands

ESA have released a video of the European Student Earth Orbiter ESEO satellite which carries an amateur radio payload.

ESEO is expected to launch as part of Spaceflight’s SSO-A SmallSat Express mission, on a SpaceX Falcon 9 from Vandenberg Air Force Base. The launch is currently scheduled for November 19, 2018 at 18:32 GMT.

Watch the launch live at
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PJkRM5QQDAA

The AMSAT payload, provided by AMSAT-UK in cooperation with the University of Surrey, UK, allows the satellite to establish a downlink connection to hundreds of ground stations in the AMSAT network, sending both housekeeping and scientific data. These data will be used to run science and technology lessons in schools and universities.

Radio amateurs will be able to communicate via the 1260/145 MHz FM transponder.

IARU Coordinated Frequencies:
• Main ESEO Telemetry Beacon 437.000 MHz 4k8 or 9k6 GMSK AX25
• FUNcube-4 Beacon 145.895 MHz 4k8 BPSK
• FM Uplink 1263.500 MHz CTCSS 67 Hz
• FM Downlink 145.895 MHz

Watch European Student Earth Orbiter ready for launch

ESEO https://amsat-uk.org/satellites/communications/eseo/

Satellites with Amateur Radio payloads on the SSO-A mission
https://amsat-uk.org/2018/11/14/ssoa-amateur-radio-satellites/

Es’hail-2 / P4-A positioning and IOT phase started

lør, 17/11/2018 - 18:08
Es'hail-2 Mission Patch

Es’hail-2 Mission Patch

Following the successful launch on November 15 of Es’hail-2 on board the SpaceX Falcon 9 launch vehicle, Mitsubishi (MELCO) and Es’hailSat will begin the In Orbit Testing (IOT) program once the satellite has been positioned in a test orbital slot – the positioning should be achieved in the next few days.

The IOT phase will take a few months, during which time the amateur radio payload will not be turned on.

AMSAT-DL will be commissioning the Amateur transponder ground station in Doha with the Es’hailSat control team.

Once IOT is complete, the satellite will be moved to the final orbital slot at 26 degrees and there will be an announcement by AMSAT-DL when the transponders are available for use.

Before this announcement, no attempt should be made to use the transponders as any interference to the test program will delay the release and if excessive interference is seen may cause the satellite owners not to make the facility available for amateur use.

Source AMSAT-DL
https://amsat-dl.org/p4a-positionining-and-iot
https://twitter.com/amsatdl

Es’hail-2 geostationary satellite information including video of a presentation on the transponders
https://amsat-uk.org/2018/11/05/eshail-2-geostationary-transponders/

Coming soon Es’hail-2 WebSDR https://eshail.batc.org.uk/

JY1SAT Launch Information and Dashboard

fre, 16/11/2018 - 15:37
JY1SAT CubeSat

JY1SAT CubeSat

JY1Sat is an enhanced 1U FUNcube. It has been developed for the Crown Prince Foundation in Jordan. The spacecraft has been named in honour of the Crown Prince’s grandfather, King Hussein, who operated using his personal amateur radio callsign which was simply JY1.

In addition to the usual suite of FUNcube capabilities it will also be capable of downlinking images in SSDV format.  This image format, developed by Phil Heron, MI0VIM, for use in High Altitude Balloons, is now also being used from lunar orbit by AO-94.

The telemetry downlink frequency is 145.840 MHz, this will use the usual FUNcube standard 1k2 BPSK format. The linear transponder, for Single Sideband (SSB) and CW modes, will downlink on 145.855-145.875 MHz and uplink on 435.100-435.120 MHz. The transponder is inverting so Lower Sideband (LSB) should be used on the uplink and Uppersideband (USB) on the downlink.

A new Dashboard has been developed for this mission and is available for download here:

This will operate in exactly the same manner as those developed for previous missions and general set-up information can be downloaded here: Dashboard Guidance

A brand new Data Warehouse has also been created. This can be used to view the telemetry from ALL of the FUNcube missions. This can his can viewed here http://data2.amsat-uk.org/

SSO-A Mission Patch

SSO-A Mission Patch

This mission will be one of the payloads on the Spaceflight SSO-A mission. This is currently scheduled to lift-off on Monday, November 19, 2018 at 18:32 GMT from the Vandenberg Air Force base in California. This launch is expected to have more than sixty other payloads. The deployment time for JY1SAT has been advised as 4 hours 31 minutes and 54.5 seconds after launch. This means that, allowing for the pre-programmed delay of 30 minutes between deployment from the POD and the release of the antennas, the first downlink signals cannot be expected until approximately 23:34 GMT on November 19.

Watch the launch at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PJkRM5QQDAA

Here are some initial pre-launch TLEs which we believe will be accurate for at least the first few orbits.

JY1-Sat
1 50001U 18001A 18323.01450000 .00000000 00000-0 30100-5 0 9992
2 50001 97.7750 30.5000 0012840 225.0000 124.7930 15.00300000 11

Provisional SatPC32 Doppler.sqf data for tracking JY1SAT and other Amateur Radio satellites on SSO-A at
https://gist.github.com/magicbug/cf23cfca3a6ec9902d8dd9326a9249ea

Initial indications are that the spacecraft will be over NE Australia at power-up.

The start-up mode, as usual, is low power telemetry only and we will be really looking forward to receiving reports  and telemetry. So please, either upload the data from the Dashboard to the Warehouse in the usual way, or send a quick email to operations@funcube.org.uk

SSO-A mission with Amateur Radio satellites launches Nov. 19

ons, 14/11/2018 - 15:23
SSO-A mission - credit Spaceflight

SSO-A mission – credit Spaceflight

Spaceflight’s SSO-A SmallSat Express mission, on a SpaceX Falcon 9 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, is currently scheduled for November 19, 2018 at 18:32 GMT.

It is planned to launch 15 microsatellites and 56 CubeSats on this mission, some with amateur radio payloads. A full list of satellites to be deployed, can be found at https://directory.eoportal.org/web/eoportal/satellite-missions/content/-/article/sso-a

Satellites known to have Amateur Radio payloads are:

CSIM http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=585A
Downlink 437.250 MHz

ESEO http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=82
Downlink on 437.00MHz and a transponder Uplink on 1263.500MHz
have been coordinated. A revised downlink frequency of 145.895 MHz has
been coordinated for FM voice and 1k2/4k8 BPSK telemetry

Exseed http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=636
Downlink 145.900 MHz for FM repeater 67 Hz and digipeater downlink and for telemetry and
435.340 MHz for repeater and digipeater uplink

Fox 1C (Fox 1Cliff) http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=455
Downlink 145.920 MHz for FM voice and DUV data and Uplinks on 435.300 and 1267.300 MHz

JY1-Sat http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=554
Downlink 145.840 MHz and transponder downlink passband on
145.855-145.875 MHz with an inverting uplink on 435.100 – 435.120 MHz

K2SAT http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/admin/update.php?serial=552
Downlink TLM beacon 435.835 MHz, FM Repeater 436.225 MHz and for Data 2404.000 MHz. FM Repeater Uplink 145.980 MHz

KNACKSAT http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=520
Downlink 435.635 MHz

IRVINE02 http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=557
Downlink 437.450 MHz

ITASAT http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=435
Downlink 145.860 MHz and 2400.150 MHz

MinXSS-2 http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=477
Downlink 437.250 MHz

MOVE-2 http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=487
To avoid a frequency clash with another mission, a revised downlink frequency of 145.950 MHz has been coordinated for 9k6 BPSK

PW-Sat-2 http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=545
Downlink 435.275 MHz

RANGE A &B http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/admin/update.php?serial=497
Downlink 437.150 MHz (A) and 437.475 MHz (B)

SNUGLITE http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/admin/update.php?serial=529
Downlink 437.275 MHz has been coordinated

SNUSAT-2 http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/admin/update.php?serial=509
Downlink 437.625 MHz and 2402 MHz

SUOMI-100 http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/admin/update.php?serial=507
Downlink 437.775 MHz and 2410 MHz

Visioncube http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=607
Downlink 437.425 MHz

Information on IARU coordinated satellite frequencies can be found at http://www.amsat.org.uk/iaru/

Fox-1Cliff Currently Scheduled for November 19 Launch

fre, 09/11/2018 - 17:59
Fox-1Cliff CubeSat

Fox-1Cliff CubeSat

AMSAT is counting down to the launch of the next Fox-1 satellite, Fox-1Cliff.

Per Spaceflight Now, the launch of Spaceflight’s SSO-A SmallSat Express mission, on a SpaceX Falcon 9 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, is currently scheduled for November 19, 2018 at 18:32 UTC.

Fox-1Cliff carries the Fox-1 U/v FM repeater, AMSAT’s L-Band Downshifter, the flight spare of the AO-85 Vanderbilt University Low Energy Proton (LEP) radiation experiment, and the standard Fox-1 Penn State University–Erie MEMS gyroscope experiment. Virginia Tech provided a VGA camera which is the same as AO-92’s but will provide images at a higher 640 x 480 resolution. Additional information about the launch and early operations phase (LEOP) will be released prior to launch.

As part of the preparations for the launch of Fox-1Cliff, AMSAT is making the “Getting Started With Amateur Satellites” book available for a limited time as a download with any paid new or renewal membership purchased via the AMSAT Store. This offer is only
available with purchases completed online, and for only a limited time. A perennial favorite, Getting Started is updated every year with the latest amateur satellite information, and is the premier primer of satellite operation. The 186 page book is presented in PDF format, in full color, and covers all aspects of making your first contacts on a ham radio satellite.

Please take advantage of this offer today by visiting the AMSAT store at https://www.amsat.org/shop/ and selecting any membership option.

While there, check out AMSAT’s other items, including the M2 LEOpack antenna system, Arrow antennas, AMSAT shirts, and other swag. Be sure to view your cart before going to checkout. If you add a membership and then go directly to checkout, you’ll never see an option to add your free gift.

Fox-1Cliff is named in honor of long-time AMSAT member, contributor, and benefactor Cliff Buttschardt, K7RR (SK), who passed away in 2016. Cliff’s contributions to AMSAT and other amateur satellite programs, including serving as an adviser during the initial development of the CubeSat specification at California Polytechnic State University, earned him the Lifetime Achievement Award from Project OSCAR in 2006.

Source AMSAT News Service https://www.amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/ans

Video of Es’hail-2 geostationary amateur radio transponders talk

man, 05/11/2018 - 15:57

More videos from the AMSAT-UK Colloquium, part of the RSGB Convention, held at Milton Keynes Oct 13-14, are now available on the AMSAT-UK YouTube Channel.

Among the presentations is one about the amateur radio transponders on the satellite Es’hail-2 expected to be launched into a geostationary orbit soon.

Es’hail-2 and its Amateur Radio payload by Graham Shirville G3VZV and Dave Crump G8GKQ

Read an article on the Es’hail-2 transponders at
http://rsgb.org/main/files/2018/11/7.1x_AMSAT-UK_Eshail-2_Transponder_Info.pdf

Other videos can be seen at https://www.youtube.com/user/AMSATUK/videos

Live stream of AMSAT Symposium

fre, 02/11/2018 - 20:44

There will be a live video stream from the 2018 William A. Tynan W3XO Memorial Space Symposium on Saturday, November 3, starting 1300 GMT (0800 CDT).

Watch the live stream from Huntsville, Alabama

FCC Satellite Related Filings

ons, 31/10/2018 - 14:43

FCC SealFor easier navigation of US FCC Satellite related filings Luke Rehmann has built an RSS feed of the FCC’s ELS and IBFS systems.

The FCC Experimental Licensing System provides companies with temporary authorization to conduct temporary experimental wireless communication lab-testing, space launch/recovery communication, and other short-duration wireless communication needs
https://fcc.report/ELS/

The International Bureau administers international telecommunications and satellite programs and policies, including licensing and regulatory functions. The bureau also promotes pro-competitive policies abroad, coordinates global spectrum activities and advocates U.S. interests in international communications and competition
https://fcc.report/IBFS/

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